PART-TIME VEGAS RESIDENT CIRSTEA TO FACE LEPCHENKO FOR LEXUS OF LAS VEGAS OPEN TITLE ON SUNDAY

LAS VEGAS, Nev., (Oct. 2, 2010) – Sorana Cirstea has played on the grandest stages in tennis, including the All-England Club at Wimbledon and Roland Garros at the French Open. But the 20-year-old Romanian told the Lexus of Las Vegas Open tennis fans there was no place she would have rather been on Saturday than Las Vegas.

“It doesn’t matter if it’s Roland Garros or wherever, it’s just a pleasure to play before all these wonderful people,” said the No. 3 seeded Cristea, after her 6-3, 6-4 win over her countrywoman and top-seeded Edina Gallovits in the semifinals of the USTA $50,000 Pro Circuit event being held at the Red Rock Country Club in Summerlin.

Cirstea, who lives in Las Vegas a quarter of the year training with the Adidas group led by Darren Cahill and Gil Reyes, will meet American Varvara Lepchenko in today’s final. Lepchenko, the No. 2 seed, beat No. 4 Mirjana Lucic in similar fashion, 6-3, 6-4, in the first semifinal on Saturday.

Cirstea controlled the match opening up a 5-1 second set lead with her popping first serve and consistent groundstrokes. “She is tough to play because she is such a good friend,” Cirstea said of the 25-year-old Gallovits, who she now holds a 3-0 career head-to-head against, including a straight-set win over her in the first round at the 2009 Wimbledon Championships.

Cirstea has dropped just one set in the tournament, which came in the first round against American Irina Falconi. “After I survived that first round I started feeling more confidence,” she said.

The lefty Lepchenko got her revenge against Lucic, who beat her last week in the semifinals at the Albuquerque, N.M., Pro Circuit event. In that match, Lepchenko was actually up a set and a break before letting Lucic back in the match which Lucic ultimately won, 1-6, 7-5, 6-1. “I did start to remember about last week when I was up 3-0 and 4-1 in the second set,” Lepchenko said. “I just had to keep reminding myself to stay aggressive.”

A native of Uzbekistan, Lepchenko currently resides in Allentown, Pa. She has lived in the United States since 2001 after receiving political asylum and became a U.S. citizen in 2007.

In the doubles final on Sunday at 11 a.m., wild cards Falconi and Maria Sanchez will face No. 4 seeds Lindsay Lee-Waters and Megan Moulton-Levy.

Saturday’s Semifinal Singles Results

wc: wild card

Varvara Lepchenko, U.S. (2), def. Mirjana Lucic, Croatia (4), 6-3, 6-4

Sorana Cirstea, Romania (3), def. Edina Gallovits, Romania (1), 6-3, 6-4

Sunday’s Finals Order of Play

Stadium Court Starting at 11 a.m.

Irina Falconi, U.S. / Maria Sanchez, U.S. (wc), vs. Lindsay Lee-Waters, U.S. / Megan Moulton-Levy, U.S. (4)

Followed by Varvara Lepchenko, U.S. (2), vs. Sorana Cirstea, Romania (3)

The tournament title sponsor is Lexus of Las Vegas with the presenting sponsor Hand Surgery Specialists of Nevada. Thank you to all the members who sponsored the tournament, including Dan Jackson with Raymond James, Kate Lowe of State Farm. Dwain Frazier of All State, Rob Weisbord of CW Las Vegas, Keith Brille of Women’s Specialty Care and Dr. Jeffrey Ng, .MD, among many others.

For additional event and ticket information, please visit www.lexuslvopen.com.

LAS VEGAS PAST CHAMPIONS

Singles

Year                Winner                                                Runner-up

2009                Regina Kulikova (RUS)                      Aniko Kapros (HUN)

2008                Camille Pin (FRA)                               Asia Muhammad (U.S.)

2007                Caroline Wozniacki (DEN)                 Akiko Morigami (JPN)

1999                Erika de Lone (U.S.)                           Hila Rosen (ISR)

Doubles

Year                Winner

2009                Aniko Kapros (HUN) – Agustina Lepore (ARG)

2008                Melinda Czink (HUN) – Renata Voracova (CZE)

2007                Victoria Azarenka (BLR) – Tatiana Poutchek (BLR)

1999                Erika de Lone (U.S.) – Annabel Ellwood (AUS)

PRIZE MONEY

SINGLES: Prize Money               Points

Winner                         $7,315                         70

Runner-up                   $3,990                         50

Semifinalist                 $2,185                         32

Quarterfinalist             $1,235                         18

Round of 16                $760                            10

Round of 32                $475                            1

DOUBLES:                   Prize Money (per team)

Winner                         $2,660

Runner-up                     $1,425

Semifinalist                 $760

Quarterfinalist             $380

Round of 16                $285

USTA Pro Circuit

With 94 tournaments throughout the country and prize money ranging from $10,000 to $100,000, the USTA Pro Circuit is the pathway to the US Open and tour-level competition for aspiring tennis players and a frequent battleground for established professionals. Last year, more than 1,000 men and women from more than 70 countries competed on the USTA Pro Circuit for approximately $3.2 million in prize money and valuable ATP and WTA Tour ranking points. Maria Sharapova, Andy Roddick, James Blake, Lindsay Davenport, Jo-Wilfried Tsonga and Jelena Jankovic are among the top stars who began their careers on the USTA Pro Circuit. The USTA Pro Circuit is world-class tennis administered on the local level and played on local tennis courts as part of the fabric of communities nationwide — an opportunity for current and new fans to experience the excitement and intensity of the professional game in their neighborhood.

WILD-CARD MUELLER BEATS STEVENSON ON DAY 1 OF LEXUS OF LAS VEGAS USTA WOMEN’S $50,000 PRO CIRCUIT EVENT

LAS VEGAS, Nev., (Sept. 28, 2010) – Advantage, wild cards.

Alexandra Mueller, a 22-year-old from Abington, Pa., and Chelsey Gullickson, 20, from Palm Beach Gardens, Fla., took full advantage of their wild cards on Tuesday during the first day of the Lexus of Las Vegas Open, a USTA $50,000 women’s event being played at the Red Rock Country Club.

Mueller beat veteran Alexandra Stevenson, 5-7, 6-1, 6-3 and now owns a 2-1 career head-to-head advantage over Stevenson having won the last two, including another three-setter at a Boston $50,000 Challenger in June.

“I’m familiar with her having her played her those two other times,” said Mueller, who was the winner of the U.S. National Open Playoff over the summer and won a wild-card in the qualifying at the U.S. Open. “I know she can turn it on at times and be real explosive. I had a couple of set points in the first that I couldn’t pull the trigger on.”

Stevenson, who will be 30 in December, is currently ranked No. 323 in the world while Mueller is No. 442.

Joining Mueller in the winner’s circle was another wild-card Gullickson. The 2010 NCAA singles champion from Georgia is taking the fall off from school to see how she does in professional events. She had a nice won over No. 7 seeded Julia Cohen on Tuesday, beating the world’s No. 169 player, 0-6 7-6 (3), 6-2. Gullickson, who is the daughter of former major league pitcher Bill Gullickson, recently played at the U.S. Open, losing a night match on Arthur Ashe Stadium Court to top-seeded Caroline Wozniacki in the first round.

Only two other main draw singles matches were played with No. 2 seeded Varvara Lepchenko of the U.S. beating Kathrin Woerle of Germany, 6-3, 6-3 and Florida’s Lauren Albanese taking out Stephanie Foretz Gacon of France, 7-6 (4), 6-0

Las Vegas’ Asia Muhammad, 19, will play her first singles match in the last match on Stadium Court on Wednesday against No. 5 seeded Mariana Duque-Marino of Colombia, not before 4 p.m.  Muhammad is currently ranked No. 443 in the world and was a surprise quarterfinalist in the event last year and a runner-up in a similar event in 2008.

It was a good day to be an odd-numbered seeded player in qualifying as the No. 1, 3, 5 and 7 seeded players all won matches Tuesday to gain entry into the main draw. Former Georgia Tech All-American Irina Falconi (No. 1), all-time USTA Pro Circuit singles leader Julie Ditty (3), Ashley Weinhold (No. 5) and Brittany Augustine (No. 7) each won straight-set matches.

Two of those qualifiers will face each other in the first round on Wednesday as Ditty drew Weinhold.

First-Round Singles Scores

Varvara Lepchenko (U.S.) (2) def. Kathrin Woerle (GER), 6-3, 6-3

Lauren Albanese (U.S.) def. Stephanie Foretz Gacon (FRA), 7-6 (4), 6-0

Chelsey Gullickson (U.S.) (wc) def. Julia Cohen (U.S.) (7), 0-6 7-6 (3), 6-2

Alexandra Mueller (U.S.) (wc) def. Alexandra Stevenson (U.S.), 5-7, 6-1, 6-3

First-Round Doubles Scores

Lindsay Lee-Waters (U.S.) (4) / Megan Moulton-Levy def. Asia Muhammad (U.S.) / Ashley Weinhold (U.S.), 6-4, 6-2

Kimberly Couts (U.S.) / Anna Tatishvili (GEO) (3) def. Sabrina Capannolo (U.S.) / Amanda Fink (U.S.), 6-1, 6-3

Christina Fusano (U.S.) / Courtney Nagle (U.S.) def. Heidi El Tabakh (CAN) / Riza Zalameda (U.S.), 6-2, 6-2

Irina Falconi (U.S.) / Maria Sanchez (U.S.) def. Jorgelina Cravero (ARG) / Kathrin Woerle (GER), 6-0, 3-6, (10-7)

Stephanie Foretz Gacon (FRA) / Alexa Glatch (U.S.) def. Nicole Melichar (U.S.) / Petra Rampre (SLO), 6-1, 6-0

Abigail Spears (U.S.) (2) / Mashona Washington (U.S.) def. Lauren Albanese (U.S.) / Laura Siegemund (GER), 6-3, 6-2

Madison Brengle (U.S.) / def. Amra Sadikovic (SUI) def. Sorana Cirstea (ROU) / Edina Gallovits (ROU) (1), 6-2, 5-7, (10-6)

Final Qualifying Scores

Ashley Weinhold (U.S.) (5) def. Jorgelina Cravero (ARG) (4), 6-1 6-2

Brittany Augustine (U.S.) (7) def. Julia Boserup (U.S.) (2), 6-4 7-5

Julie Ditty (U.S.) (3) def. Maria Sanchez (U.S.), 6-0 6-1

Irina Falconi (U.S.) (1) def. Amanda Fink (U.S.) (6), 6-4 7-5

Wednesday’s Order of Play

q: qualifier; wc: wild card

Starting at 10 a.m. on Stadium Court

Mashona Washington (U.S.) vs. Alexa Glatch (U.S.) (wc)

Camila Giorgi (ITA) vs. Mirjana Lucic (CRO) (4)

Sorana Cirstea (ROU) (3) vs. Irina Falconi (U.S.) (q)

Asia Muhammad (U.S.) (wc) vs. vs. Mariana Duque-Marino (COL) (5)

Starting at 10 a.m. on Court 2

Edina Gallovits (ROU) (1) vs. Petra Rampre (SLO)

Heidi El Tabakh (CAN) vs. Madison Brengle (U.S)

Kimberly Couts (U.S.) vs. Brittany Augustine (U.S) (q)

Ashley Weinhold (U.S.) (q) vs. Julie Ditty (U.S) (q)

Starting at 10 a.m. on Court 3

Ekaterina Shulaeva (CAN) vs. Valerie Tetreault (CAN) (8)

Abigail Spears (U.S.) vs. Laura Siegemund (GER)

Lindsay Lee-Waters (U.S.) vs. Shelby Rogers (U.S.)

Liga Dekmeijere (LAT) / Varvara Lepchenko (U.S.) vs. Alexandra Mueller (U.S.) / Ahsha Rolle (U.S.)

Starting at 10 a.m. on Court 5

Anna Tatishvili (GEO) (6) vs. Amra Sadikovic (SUI)

The following is a tentative schedule of events supplementing the tournament:

COMMUNITY EVENTS

  • Wednesday Sept. 29 – Players Party at J.W. Marriott, 6-9 p.m. (Free for ticket holders).
  • Thursday Sept. 30 – High School Day, 6-8 p.m. (Free general admission for ages 15-18).
  • Friday, Oct. 1 – Volkl/Becker Racquet Day, 6-8 p.m.

USTA Members Day ($10 off admission for all current USTA members)

  • Saturday, Oct. 2 – Super Semifinal Saturday; USTA Ladies League Luncheon.

For additional event and ticket information, please visit www.lexuslvopen.com

LAS VEGAS PAST CHAMPIONS

Singles

Year                Winner                                                Runner-up

2009                Regina Kulikova (RUS)                      Aniko Kapros (HUN)

2008                Camille Pin (FRA)                               Asia Muhammad (U.S.)

2007                Caroline Wozniacki (DEN)                 Akiko Morigami (JPN)

1999                Erika de Lone (U.S.)                           Hila Rosen (ISR)

Doubles

Year                Winner

2009                Aniko Kapros (HUN) – Agustina Lepore (ARG)

2008                Melinda Czink (HUN) – Renata Voracova (CZE)

2007                Victoria Azarenka (BLR) – Tatiana Poutchek (BLR)

1999                Erika de Lone (U.S.) – Annabel Ellwood (AUS)

PRIZE MONEY

SINGLES:                    Prize Money              Points

Winner                         $7,315                         70

Runner-up                   $3,990                         50

Semifinalist                 $2,185                         32

Quarterfinalist             $1,235                         18

Round of 16                $760                            10

Round of 32                $475                            1

DOUBLES:                Prize Money (per team)

Winner                         $2,660

Runner-up                   $1,425

Semifinalist                 $760

Quarterfinalist             $380

Round of 16                $285

USTA Pro Circuit

With 94 tournaments throughout the country and prize money ranging from $10,000 to $100,000, the USTA Pro Circuit is the pathway to the US Open and tour-level competition for aspiring tennis players and a frequent battleground for established professionals. Last year, more than 1,000 men and women from more than 70 countries competed on the USTA Pro Circuit for approximately $3.2 million in prize money and valuable ATP and WTA Tour ranking points. Maria Sharapova, Andy Roddick, James Blake, Lindsay Davenport, Jo-Wilfried Tsonga and Jelena Jankovic are among the top stars who began their careers on the USTA Pro Circuit. The USTA Pro Circuit is world-class tennis administered on the local level and played on local tennis courts as part of the fabric of communities nationwide — an opportunity for current and new fans to experience the excitement and intensity of the professional game in their neighborhood.

Federer makes history, outlasts Roddick in epic

There’s a new grand slam king and his name is Roger Federer. The magnificent 27 year-old Swiss Maestro gave a performance for the ages, serving up 50 aces and topping the century mark in winners (107)- outlasting American Andy Roddick, who played brilliantly but somehow fell just short in another five set Wimbledon final classic.

That’s what it took to become the all-time winningest men’s singles grand slam champion, capturing his record 15th major with previous record holder Pete Sampras looking on.

A year following arguably the greatest match ever in which the five-time champ lost to Rafael Nadal with the final score 9-7 in the final set, it was another one for the ages as Federer and Roddick went toe to toe for nearly four and a half hours before the gutsy 26 year-old No.6 seed cracked first, falling 5-7, 7-6 (6), 7-6 (5), 3-6, 16-14.

Yes. The final set really was 16-14! It featured 30 total games and lasted longer (95 minutes) than Serena Williams’ straight set women’s championship win for her third crown over big sis Venus Williams a day before. Indeed, it was one of those matches where unfortunately, someone had to lose leaving fans heartbroken for Roddick, who really deserved better.

There’s no question that Andy’s overall game has improved leaps and bounds this season under new coach Larry Stefanki, who has finally gotten the talented American to buy into a new strategy. As he proved in a great semifinal win over London local favorite Andy Murray, Roddick continued to play the kind of all court game which made the heavy favorite Federer vulnerable. The game’s best server not only backed it up with vigor keeping one of the better returners off balance despite a 2-18 career head to head record but also mixed up his game slugging it out while also picking his spots, finishing points with rapid success at the net like never seen.

The new Andy also showed off his much improved backhand, steaming plenty down the line with winners even on the run reminding of Nadal. Before this year, you couldn’t even put the two in the same sentence. That’s the kind of true dedication this A-Rod’s put into his fitness, showing that just maybe the second part of his career can be more successful.

Perhaps that gave him added confidence along with some recent close matches where he pushed Roger this season with a couple going three sets. One down in Miami he should’ve won. Of course, you could easily argue the same today as Roddick put American men’s tennis back on the map with a virtuoso performance- the likes of which we have never seen before from the 2003 U.S. Open winner.

He’d always been a dangerous out due to his ridiculous serve and huge forehand. However, today Roddick put it all together demonstrating early on that it could be different this time, even if everyone had Federer running away with his record 15th grand slam and sixth trophy at the All England Club.

Indeed he didn’t flinch in a tightly contested opening set that looked headed to a tiebreak. But after showing plenty of guts escaping four breaking points with huge serving and hitting to hold for 6-5, a focused Roddick cashed in on a shaky game from Federer- converting his only break point by banging a deep backhand which drew a wide reply. A stunning conclusion that gave him the lead. Something he had in their first Wimbledon final in 2004 before blowing a set, break lead in which Roger was able to use a rain delay to recover for a four set repeat.

Much like that match, the two players played a game of chicken as each strongly held serve during an even closer second set which would require a breaker. Early on, it again was Federer who felt the pressure with all-time greats Sampras, Rod Laver and Bjorn Borg all looking on from Centre Court. He misfired a forehand way long handing Roddick an early minibreak which the popular American was only too pleased to take eventually building a 6-2 lead, winning another point from the baseline with that improved backhand earning another miscue.

Suddenly, the crowd sensed what was happening. Would the champion fall behind two sets like last year? Instead, he provided the kind of resiliency one has come to expect, remarkably fighting off four set points before winning the next two, making it six unanswered to take the second.

How did such a houdini act occur? First, Federer pulled off a very tough baseline backhand half volley winner crosscourt to get one mini back for 3-6. Then, he banged two big serves suddenly pulling within 5-6. Perhaps Roddick thought about the moment because he was in great position at the net to claim the set but steered a high backhand volley way wide to level it. All he had to do was put it back in the open court. Instead, momentum swung with Federer then using a strong backhand pass to draw an error before getting a Roddick long backhand to draw even.

Would Andy be able to recover from such a bitter disappointment? He answered quickly by showing nerves of steel holding serve again to start the third. You could tell how badly he wanted that first Wimbledon. If he was going to lose, it would be on his terms. With one of the greatest servers looking on in Sampras, there was Roddick putting on a serving display that would make the seven-time Wimbledon and 14-time slam legend proud as he sat with shades on next to lovely wife Bridgette Wilson.

By now, it became apparent he wasn’t going away hardly allowing Federer a crack. In all their slam matches, Roddick had never been able to hold off his nemesis like this. It was truly something to behold. Despite not finding a way to break- something he grew accustomed to in the epic defeat to Nadal- Roger remained focused going serve for serve to force another breaker.

The quality of the points were terrific with each trying to gain an edge by finding new angles. There was Roddick making stab half volley winners and coming up with ridiculous winners like the curling crosscourt forehands he’d used so efectively against Murray. Predictably, there also was the precision of Federer, who banged his forehand from everywhere. If the Swiss Maestro was to make history, it was needed.

The third breaker this time saw Federer assume early control going up 5-1 but Roddick didn’t budge getting back in it with an inside out forehand winner crosscourt for one mini making it 3-6. After two big serves, suddenly it was just like the second set with it on Roger’s racket. Could he do what Roddick couldn’t? The answer was provided immediately with him kicking one out wide that Andy scrambled to get back but Feds disposed of a short reply with a forehand winner letting out his traditional, “Come on!”

Suddenly, the end seemed in sight. Roddick never cracked continuing to play the same aggressive game that had gotten him closer to beating Federer in a slam final than ever before. He continued to pound his serve making it tough. Finally, Andy found an opening breaking for 3-1 with another brilliant point that got an error, giving a huge emotional pump of the fist.

Federer didn’t go down easily in the next game getting to 15-30 but Roddick served his way out of trouble. Every time he needed one, he delivered. Towards the fourth set’s conclusion, he accidentally slipped on a worn baseline nearly turning something. It was clear that he was hobbled which Federer took advantage of for a quick hold. Looking to break back at 3-5, Federer got the first couple of points including a forehand up the line for Love-30. With the crowd urging Roddick on, he again responded with clutch serving eventually coming back to hold, forcing a fifth set against Federer for the first time in their 21st meeting.

And so, the crowd would get another treat as for the third consecutive year, here was another epic men’s final going the distance. A place where three-time Wimbledon champ Boris Becker had once uttered a memorable quote about it being a test of wills.

That would be put to a true test in what became the longest fifth set in championship history. In the second game, Roddick fought off a break point to hold for one all. That was it for a while as both players ratcheted up the level with remarkable serving, great shotmaking and few errors. It was truly the kind of sporting event any observer could appreciate.

The way Andy was serving, it looked like it would be a tall order for Federer- an above average server in his own right to pull this off. Somehow, he kept dialing up aces going out wide in the ad court time and time again while effectively mixing up the tee on the Deuce side. Never before had the great champion had so many aces, winding up with nearly half the 50 in the fifth. It was 21 or 22.

Roddick did well himself finishing with 27. While that seemed equally shocking because he’s the best server, it’s also due to Federer who gets a lot of balls back even if some didn’t come close. Here was the American hoping it was finally his day with the only two breaks of the match but wondering what he had to do to win. Federer had to be thinking similarly against an opponent he’d handled.

Up 5-4, 6-5, 7-6 and 8-7 in the deciding set, Federer couldn’t put away Roddick who kept coming up with the goods in sudden death. Would the moment finally get to him like last year? After Roddick held for eight apiece, here came his chance nailing a forehand winner for 15-40 setting up double break point. It may as well have been championship point with the kind of zone he was in. But before the blink of an eye, there was Roger delivering a service winner and then kicking one out and striking a daring trademark volley forehand winner inside the baseline. One foul up and it would’ve been enough to lose. Instead, he saved them and dug out of trouble to hold for 9-8.

The battle of wills continued into double digits with many observers wondering how long it would go. You had two players playing at a ridiculously high level with remarkable winner/error ratios (Roddick-74/33, Federer-107/38). It bordered on absurd.

You got the feeling when he struck ace 50 that Feds could still lose. In fact, never before in tennis history had a player won a match with that many aces. Roddick also had experience escaping a similar contest down under six years ago against Younes El Aynaoui, prevailing 21-19 in the fifth with both saving seven match points before the American won. It remains the longest fifth set in grand slam history.

This was unchartered territory for Federer. Would he show any more leaks? That became a resounding no as he dialed up his play nailing more aces and cracking more winners to continue holding, applying the pressure on Roddick.

Finally in the 30th game, Andy cracked. Playing two loose points by misfiring badly, he was two points from losing. Urged on by plenty of supporters despite the momentous occasion, he quickly replied with two consecutive points squaring at 30-all. Just when it looked like he might escape, an errant forehand suddenly setup championship point.

With the crowd moaning, it was finally over when Roddick missed a backhand long sending an extremely overjoyed Federer to jump up and down screaming while pumping his fists. He then ran to the net congratulating a heartbroken Roddick, who somehow didn’t tear up sitting in his chair head down.

It was a memorable scene. One which NBC commentator John McEnroe identified with after losing a similar classic to Borg. Of course, Federer related during a great trophy presentation noting last year’s gutwrenching loss to which Roddick sarcastically replied:

But you won five already.

“Roger is a true champion and he deserves all he gets,” he added while showing class during a trying time with stunning swimsuit model/wife Brooklyn Decker looking on still cheering her man.

I hope to come back one day and get my name up on that winners’ board.

So do we because you deserved better. Keep your head up Andy. After he’d left the court minus talking to McEnroe (could hardly blame him), there were four tennis legends together discussing Federer’s place with an excited Mac getting their thoughts. Federer even took a picture with Sampras, Laver and Borg with his newest trophy. One for the ages.

In my book, Roger is the greatest of all time. He has his critics and people point to Rafael Nadal beating him, but for me he’s the greatest. He is a legend and an icon,” Sampras praised.

He is a great champion and a good guy. He’s very humble, which I like.

Strong words from a man who was dethroned by a much younger Federer in 2001. Too bad it was their only match on grass as it went five. Who’s better? I guess that debate shall rage on. As for becoming the new record holder, Federer was philosophical.

“I didn’t hold the trophy last year. But it feels great after such a crazy match which could have gone on for a few more hours. My head is still spinning.

Getting 15 Grand Slam titles is not something you dream about when you are a little boy, but I’ve had a great career.

It’s been quite a month winning the French Open and Wimbledon back-to-back just like Bjorn Borg did.

I don’t play to break records but it’s great to have them.

About what we’ve come to expect from such a classy champion. So, will Roddick ever win another major? He seemed to think so praising his opponent during the ceremony also adding:

“Andy (Roddick) played an unbelievable tournament. He’s a great guy but there has to be a winner sometimes.”

What wasn’t uttered is that there has to be a loser. Though few could argue that on this special day, there was no loser.

Only winners.