Top Seeds Move On At Claremont USTA Pro Circuit Futures Event

CLAREMONT, Calif., (Sept. 14, 2012) – A five-week layoff because of an ailing back didn’t seem to bother top-seeded Alex Bogdanovic of Great Britain, who beat a determined Mark Verryth of Australia in a tough three-set match on Thursday to advance to the quarterfinals at the 17th annual Pomona Valley Hospital Medical Center Pro Classic, a $10,000 USTA Pro Circuit men’s event being played this week at the Claremont Club.

 

Bogdanovic downed Verryth, 6-4, 6-7 (5), 6-3, in the second round of play, and the current world No. 311-ranked player said afterward that he’s set to play the three SoCal Futures events in Claremont, Costa Mesa and Irvine before playing USTA Pro Circuit events in Sacramento and Tiburon.

 

“We’ll see how the body reacts,” Bogdanovic said.

 

Bogdanovic will play qualifier and former UCLA standout Haythem Abid of Tunisia in the quarterfinals on Friday. Abid, now 27 and recovering from wrist surgery on his left hand, beat fellow American and No. 7-seeded Reid Carleton, 6-4, 3-6, 6-3.

 

Abid, who played Davis Cup matches for Tunisia this year, is driving 45 miles back and forth each day from his home in West Los Angeles. He is currently training at the Weil Tennis Academy and hoping for a full 2013 tour campaign.

 

A fellow Bruin alum, No. 2-seeded Daniel Kosakowski, also won his match on Thursday and will next face fellow Southern Californian Jason Jung, who beat wild card – and yet another Bruin – Dennis Novikov in straight sets on Thursday.

 

“I’ve never face Jason but he’s playing well,” said Kosakowski, who beat American Ryan Rowe, 6-4, 7-6 (4). Kosakowski said he’s been working out with Taylor Dent and some others in Orange County recently.

 

In the doubles final on Friday scheduled for 4 p.m., Devin Britton and Reid Carleton of the United States will face fellow former collegiate standouts Jeff Dadamo and Kyle McMorrow.

 

For more information, check on the web at:www.procircuit.usta.com, www.claremontclub.com; Facebook: www.facebook.com/pages/The-Claremont-Club/236147226396

 

Thursday’s Second-Round Singles Results

WC: Wild card; Q: Qualifier

Dennis Lajola, U.S. (4), def. Boris Bakalov, Bulgaria, 3-6, 6-1, 6-4

Daniel Nguyen, U.S. (q), def. Chris Wettengel, U.S., 6-2, 6-3

Haythem Abid, Tunisia (q), def. Reid Carleton, U.S. (7), 6-4, 3-6, 6-3

Prakash Amritraj, India, def. Devin Britton, U.S. (3), 6-4, 7-6 (4)

Jason Jung, U.S. (6), def. Dennis Novikov, U.S. (wc), 6-0, 7-6 (3)

Daniel Kosakowski, U.S. (2), def. Ryan Rowe, U.S., 6-4, 7-6 (4)

Jeff Dadamo, U.S. (5), def. Finn Tearney, New Zealand (wc), 6-2, 6-0

Alex Bogdanovic, Great Britain (1), def. Mark Verryth, Australia, 6-4, 6-7 (5), 6-3

 

Thursday’s Semifinal Doubles Results

Devin Britton, U.S.-Reid Carleton, U.S. (1), def. Daniel Nguyen, U.S.-Ryan Rowe, U.S. (3), 7-5, 4-6, 10-6

Jeff Dadamo, U.S.-Kyle McMorrow, U.S. (2), def. Nicholas John Andrews, U.S.-Dennis Nevolo, U.S., 6-4, 5-7, 10-7

Note: Doubles final will take place on Friday at 4 p.m.

 

 

Recent Claremont Champions

Year   Singles Winner              Singles Runner-up            Doubles Champions

2011   Steve Johnson               Darian King                        Alexandre Lacroix-Sanam Singh

2010   Gary Sacks                    Devin Britton                      Taylor Fogleman-Chris Kearney

2009   Matej Bocko                   Bradley Klahn                    Brett Joelson-Ashwin Kumar

2008   Tigran Martirosyan          Adriano Biasello                 Marcus Fugate-Nima Roshan

2007   Carsten Ball                    Robert Yim                        Nikita Kryvonos-Michael McClune

2006   Dudi Sela                       Sascha Kloer                     Ryler DeHeart-Dennis Zivkovic

2005   Benedikt Dorsch             Tyler Cleveland                  K.C. Corkery-James Pade

2004   Bobby Reynolds            Huntley Montgomery          Nick Rainey-Brian Wilson

2003   Glenn Weiner                  Jimy Szymanski                 K.C. Corkery-James Pade

2002   Dmitry Tursunov             Raven Klaasen                   Chris Magyary-Mirko Pehar

 

 

 

Points, Prize Money for $10,000 Futures Tournaments

Singles                         Doubles

Points               Prize $              Points               Prize $

Winner                                   17                     $1,300              17                     $630

Finalist                                   9                         $900                9                    $330

Semifinalist                5                         $480                5                    $260

Quarterfinalist             2                         $290                2                    $180

Round of 16               1                         $200                1                    ——

Round of 32               0                         $117.50            –                     ——

 

USTA Pro Circuit

With approximately 90 tournaments hosted annually throughout the country and prize money ranging from $10,000 to $100,000, the USTA Pro Circuit is the pathway to the US Open and tour-level competition for aspiring tennis players and a frequent battleground for established professionals. The USTA launched its Pro Circuit 33 years ago to provide players with the opportunity to gain professional ranking points, and it has since grown to become the largest developmental tennis circuit in the world, offering nearly $3 million in prize money. Last year, more than 1,000 men and women from more than 70 countries competed in cities nationwide. Mardy Fish, Maria Sharapova, Andy Roddick, Caroline Wozniacki, John Isner, Victoria Azarenka and Andy Murray are among today’s top stars who began their careers on the USTA Pro Circuit.

Sock Has A Bright Future

FLUSHING MEADOWS, NY – It was the past against the future. American tennis’s past darling in Andy Roddick against future star Jack Sock.

And when it was the master took on the apprentice today, Roddick showed experience wins out in a straight set win over his fellow Nebraskan, 6-3 6-3 6-4.

“I didn’t think I’d ever play another guy from Nebraska in my career,” Roddick said.  “You know, it was just cool.  I could draw so many parallels to what he was going through.  You know, but also I could draw on my experience a little bit.”

Sock’s inexperience showed when he missed a few break points in the first, which could have changed the complexion of the match. It is something that will come in time for the 18 year-old, because this was such a learning experience for him.

“After watching him I knew that he kind of plays a lot from the baseline, maybe a little bit behind the baseline, makes a lot of balls, is steady,” he said.  “I felt like I could go out there and try to dictate points and try to hit a lot of forehands, try to move the ball around as much as possible, and then attack when I could.

“I felt like I did a decent job of that.  I mean, like I said, it comes down to him getting back in the court and retrieve and be able to hit passing shots how he wants, like standing still or not on the run. I felt overall like I played a pretty good match.”

But it still wasn’t enough for Roddick who came in knowing his opponent would be a little nervous playing in the big bowl for the first time in his career. According to the 21st seeded player he has participated in 27 night matches at Ashes, so tonight was just old hat.

Yet, Roddick knows this won’t be the last he sees of Sock. In fact the 2003 champ feels Sock will be one of the “legit prospects” along with fellow American Ryan Harrison. And after the match Roddick invited him to his compound in Texas to practice with him, the same way Andre Agassi did back in the early 2000s with the current American star.

“I certainly feel the need to pay it forward,” Roddick said. “This game has been great to me.  It’s pretty much an impossibility for me to do it. But as far as leaving it better than when you came, when I came it was the best generation that has ever existed in a country.

“But I enjoy having the young guys at home.  I think I can help them.  It’s inspiring for me.  You can kind of feed off of their hunger a little bit.”

And that’s how American tennis will come back. It will be a cumulative effort. Although Roddick shown Same Querrey and Harrison the same hospitality, Sock, coming from the same background in Nebraska, may have some real success working with Roddick.

Plus he has the skills. With a 135 m.p.h serve, the talent is there, so all he now has to do is hone it in and learn about the intricacies of the game that only come with experience. When that happens, Sock will move up the ranks and become a star in this game, muck like Roddick did about 10 years ago.

So this is only the beginning and soon you may see the student teaching his teacher a thing or two.

Isner Bulldogs It To The Third

FLUSHING MEADOWS, NY- Although John Isner is keeping a watchful eye on the other matchups today after his second round win over fellow American Robbie Ginepri, 6-4, 6-3, 6-4, his biggest concern is tomorrow’s big game.

It’s when his beloved Georgia Bulldogs take on Boise State.

“I’m just getting mentally prepared for that,” he said.  “I don’t watch too much tennis.”

He doesn’t need to keep watching after his strong performance on Armstrong today. The Georgia native has been on top of his game this year. This win will be his seventh in a row and that follows one that was what he thinks is an “eight or nine match” winning streak.

He took the Hall of Fame Tournament in Newport back in July and won in Winston Salem, just a few weeks ago to start his winning streak.

And what’s the secret of his recent success?

Why confidence, of course.

“It’s as high as it’s ever been,” he said. “You know, I don’t like to think too much about it, but, you know, I have won seven matches in a row now, and earlier this summer I won, I think, eight or nine matches in a row:  won Newport, made the finals of Atlanta.

“I’m just winning it a lot of matches and I’m very, very confident and I feel good.  I feel like I’m, you know, moving very well, you know, especially for myself.  I’m getting to balls and able to get a lot more balls back in play because I’m very comfortable out there.”

This is a different from the Isner we all have seen earlier this year, where he lost in French Open in the first round and Wimbledon in the second. He also had a disappointing loss in Chile during the Davis Cup.

“That was probably one of the biggest down points of my year so far, going down there and just not playing well and not really able to contribute to the team,” he said. “You know, I lost to a guy ranked pretty low in Davis Cup, and I just ‑‑ it all started once I got back to the States and started playing tournaments stateside.  Very comfortable over here.  It’s just, you know, once I won a few matches in a row ‑‑ at Newport I started ‑‑ you know, I knew my game was going in the right direction, because the first five months of the year frankly it was a disappointment.”

But the 26 year-old is now back and ready to continue on at the Open. Fortunately he has a the fifth set tie break here and there will be no repeat of his match last year at Wimbledon when he won a fifth set over Nicholas Mahut, 70-68, in a match that lasted 11 hours and five minutes.

“Every slam is different,” he said.  “To me, to be honest, I like the tiebreaker, because if it goes to a fifth set and it happens to go down to a tiebreaker I like my chances, especially with my serve.  You know, I beat Andy a couple years ago in a fifth set tiebreaker.  You know, I do like the system now.

“But, you know, I don’t think anything should change as far as the other tournaments go.  It’s just how the US Open does it.”

But that didn’t happen today – maybe later in the tournament. Right now, though, it doesn’t seem like he cares because his Bulldogs will take conter statge for him tomorrow.

And who is going to win?

“I’m partial to Georgia,” Isner predicted. “I think they’re virtually playing ‑‑ you know, they’re in their backyard playing in the Georgia Dome.  They’ll have the crowd support and it’s gonna be ‑‑ it’s a huge game to start the season, for sure.”

Spoken like a true Georgia alumni.

Wozniak To Quarters In Quebec

QUEBEC CITY, Quebec – No. 3 seed and Canadian native Aleksandra Wozniak reached the quarter final rounds of the Bell Challenge with a 6-2, 7-5 win over Russian Regina Kulikova in the second round.

Wozniak is the second highest seed after Sabine Lisicki had to withdraw from the tournament after getting injured at the US Open.

Also advancing No.4 seed Lucie Safarova beat another French-Canadian, Valérie Tétreault, 6-2, 6-2 and Bethany Mattek-Sands, who reached the finals in Quebec last year beat fellow American Vania King, 6-3, 6-3.

The quarters will all take place on Friday, with top seed Nadia Petrova facing Melinda Czink, Wozniak taking on Alla Kudryavtseva, Safarova taking on Mattek-Sands and Julia Goerges playing Lilia Osterloh.