Federer Stunned By Berdych

FLUSHING MEADOWS, NY – To paraphrase the late Howard Cosell: “Down goes Federer! Down Goes Federer!”

A shocker in the Men’s Quarterfinal saw Czech Tomas Berdych beat No. 1 seed Roger Federer in four sets  7-6, 6-4, 3-6, 6-3.

For the first time since 2003, the Maestro will not be in the US Open Semifinal and went home pretty unhappy to say the least.

“I’m sure it was a combination of many things,” Federer said.  “I mean, obviously I rarely go through matches where I have no chances, you know.

“So obviously I missed some tonight again, but that’s normal.  When you end up losing at the end, you know, you always hope that you made every chance you had.  It’s just not possible.

“He probably created more than I did, and that’s why he ended up winning tonight.”

It could have been the extra rest Federer received when Mardy Fish pulled out of the Open on Monday that ruined his sharpness. Like a pitcher, most tennis players tend to like the regular rhythm of a tournament, but the Swiss Master was forced to sit out Monday’s match when he received a walkover.

Federer though didn’t use that as an excuse.

“I have been there before,” he said.  “Once I had six‑and‑a‑half days off and I ended up winning Wimbledon.  I don’t think this was the issue tonight.”

Federer looked off from the outset, after electing to receive in the coin toss, was put on his heels by Berdych, who blew the Maestro away in the tiebreaker 6-1 and broke Federer early in the second set.

Only late in the second did Federer look like the Maestro, but down two breaks was just too much for the Swiss Master and Berdych eventually was able to come through.

But then the third set came and Federer was able to break Berdych and take the set rather easily.

“I still was down two sets to one, so I wasn’t celebrating too much,” he said. “It was good.  The momentum switch no doubt gave me a chance, put the score back to zero, put him further away from winning, and made the match go longer, make it more physical, more mental.

“Yeah, so obviously I was excited winning the third, but the problem was the first couple of sets ‑ particularly the first one.”

At that point it looked like Federer was going to paint another masterpiece, but Berdych was able to break him in the middle of the fourth to end it quickly for the Master.

“The fourth set all of a sudden ended quickly,” Federer said.  “He played good the last couple of points on my serve I think at 30‑All.  But that’s always a danger with Tomas if you’re down in the score and he can take some chances.  He’s obviously a shot‑maker, so, yeah, it’s dangerous.

“I should never lose the first set.  But anyway, it happens.  Move on.”

It will be a very different Open now that both the biggest story in Andy Roddick and its biggest draw in Roger Federer are no longer playing.

It also gives Novak Djokovic and Andy Murray excellent chances to win the whole thing.

 

Fish Withdraws From Open and Federer Match

FLUSHING MEADOWS, NY – This was the last thing Roger Federer wanted in his fourth round match against Mardy Fish.

But he will take it anyway.

Fish withdrew from the US Open for precautionary reasons after Saturday’s night win against Gilles Simon. It was unknown if it was for the same heart condition which sidelined him back in May, but the 30 year-old is not taking any chances.

“I am really sorry for Mardy,” Federer said in a statement. “I just want to wish him a speedy recovery. We all want to see him back on tour soon.”

Fish was sidelined for 2 1/2 months back in March for an accelerated heart rate and had a medical procedure done. It first happened on March 29th in Key Biscayne, FL, after losing a match, and being checked out for the heart rate.

He said in a statement today’s action was for “precautionary measures” and looks forward to “”to resuming my tournament schedule in the fall.”

For Federer, his walkover means he reached his 34th consecutive quarterfinal, extending his own record. The Swiss Master will be playing No. 6 seed Tomas Berdych, who beat No. 11 seed Nicholas Almagro 7-6(4), 6-4, 6-1.

“It will be a tough match against Tomas,” Federer said.  “We have played many times in the past and he has always been a tough opponent.  I will have to continue to serve well and dictate the points.”

Fish’s withdrawal means Andy Roddick is the only American man left in the single’s draw.

Fish Guts A Tough Night Match Out

FLUSHING MEADOWS, NY – You have to wonder if Mardy Fish took some Roger Federer pills before tonight’s match, since he came out smoking against No. 15 seed Gilles Simon, winning the first set 6-1 and was up 2-0 in the second.

But this is Mardy Fish we are talking about so nothing is ever easy for the American – or the Federer pills wore off – and he needed four sets to finish off Simon, 6-1 5-7 7-6 6-3 to advance to the fourth round of the US Open.

Fish was looked sharp early and there were a few rumbles about Simon’s shoulder, which some of the French media said was injured.

But Simon found his second wind and fought fish tough in the second and third sets, while Fish ended up with 75 unforced errors in the match to Simon’s 31.

It made the match closer than it should have because of Simon’s apparent injury, but Fish seems to be hanging around. After a five setter in the second, he now has this gritty win under the lights.

With a 1:10 in the morning ending, it was 10 minutes away from going into the top 10 latest endings in US Open History.

Too bad the Federer pills wore off early.

 

Querrey The Forgotten Man

FLUSHING MEADOWS, NY – With all the attention going to Andy Roddick, John Isner, Mardy Fish and at this tournament, James Blake, Sam Querrey has become the forgotten man at the US Open.

And it was just a year ago when he was 17th in the world but then fell to 120th after a knee injury.

Now he’s back to 28th in the world and is the No. 27 seed at the Open.

“I was hurt last year and dropped from 17 to 120,” he said. “But it was very tough to get back to where I am now at 28.”

Today he made a step to continue his climb by beating Yen-Hsun, 6-7 6-4 6-4 7-5 to move onto the second round of the Open.

“Lu is a tough player,” he said.  “A little windy.  Hits the ball low and flat.  It’s tough for me because I’m a taller guy, I like it up a little higher.

“I didn’t play my best out there, but I just stuck with it so I’m happy to move on.”

Believe it or not, Querrey could be the face of American’s tennis in the near future. He is only 24 and by today’s standards approaching his prime. A former Top 20 player in the world, Querrey has a chance to make some noise.

But he has to keep on track and that includes staying healthy and keep on winning.

“I need to keep winning like I’ve been doing,” he said. “I feel like I’ve been playing at a higher level than 28.  I feel like if I keep doing what I’m doing, I can get back into the top 15 and hopefully top 10.

“I want to keep serving big, hitting big forehands and taking risks and going for it more like I’ve been doing.”

He said we are in a period where guys in late 20s have been taking center stage. He things eventually the cycle will swing back to the teenagers eventually but that’s not anytime soon.

So with some of the top players getting older, Querrey has a chance to make some noise, even at this Open where he feels like he’s playing his best tennis.

But the second round comes first with a match against Ruben Ramirez Hidalgo.

“I play Ruben Ramirez Hidalgo who I played once before on grass in Newport like four years ago,” he said. “So I don’t really remember a whole lot.  I feel like if I serve well and do what I did today, hit big forehands, I have a good chance to win that and hopefully move on to the next round.”

If he does, he may not be the forgotten man in American men’s tennis anymore.

 

 

Fish Learns On The Job

FLUSHING MEADOWS, NY – Abe Vigoda’s character Sargent Phil Fish from Barney Miller is getting more respect than Mardy Fish these days.

As the top ranked American you would figure he should get a chance to be on Arthur Ashe Stadium one of these days, but alas the No. 8 seed still is getting showcased on the old center court Luis Armstrong stadium.

The Californian, though, doesn’t seem to mind.

“It’s definitely been like that in the past,” he said. “You know, there’s an American playing, put him on Grandstand or Louis court, and hopefully he’ll win.

“I hope it’s the beginning of that. That’s what you work towards, to have people come and appreciate what you do. You know, maybe I get the feeling, at least in the beginning of that match, that there were quite a few people there that maybe wouldn’t have been there in years past.”

Fish won his match today against South African Kevin Anderson with a straight sets victory, 6-4 7-6 7-6 to advance to the fourth round.

And if he wants to continue on his trek to greatness, he knows he need to continue disposing of opponents like the 12th Precinct captures bad guys. Straight set matches are key for the 39 year-old if he move deep into this tournament and beat one of the Big Four.

“It’s huge,” Fish said. “Mentally, physically, everything. Obviously it’s what we train for. I’ll be physically fine in two days. But, you know, I’m 29. I don’t wake up in the morning feeling like I’m 20. I don’t feel like Donald felt this morning. I’m sure he felt fine, you know. I won’t feel like that tomorrow morning.

“But we’ll do a lot of work on my body tonight, tomorrow. It’s big, you know, to get off. Last year was a prime example. I mean, I played two fivesetters in the first three rounds. I was just mentally and physically kind of drained to play someone like Novak in that next match.

“Maybe I could have come up against him, gamewise, a lot better than the score was. But I was so tired I wasn’t ready for it.”

It has been widely reported Fish has made the remarkable transformation from journeyman to star in a matter of a few years and maybe the reason he’s not getting the respect he deserves is that no one believes he could become a top player at this advanced age.

Yet, here’s Fish and like Phil Fish he is the grizzled veteran who is best at his job.

So what changed?

“Probably a lot,” Fish said. “I mean, probably first and foremost the mental side of it. You know, he seemed pretty jacked up yesterday. Obviously, you feed off the crowd. You’re not going to go away with a crowd like that, that’s for sure.

“But, you know, he lost serve at 54 and came right back, was able to hold to go to a breaker. And I think he said it after his match, that that’s probably a match he would have lost a year ago.

“Mentally he probably would have just been upset and said he had some chances and that’s it. You know, so that’s a huge part of it, as well. Maturing, growing, growing into your game, what makes you feel comfortable out on the court. There are demons out there, for sure. It’s not easy. It’s not going to be a piece of cake three out of five sets, that’s for sure.”

Fish is set to take on the winner of Jo-Wilfred Tsonga and Fernando Verdasco in the fourth round and much like the crew of Precinct 12, he will be ready for the job.

Still Fishing For Respect

FLUSHING MEADOWS, NY – Poor Mardy Fish.

Even though he is playing the best tennis of his life and comes in to the US Open as the highest ranked American, some just don’t take him as a serious threat in this tournament.

Just take this question for example after the No. 8 seed cruised today against Malek Jazuri, 6-2 6-2 6-4. Fish answered the question about being thankful about his draw.

To that one reporter responded: But you have to put yourself in that mindset, too.  Sounds like you’re a new player in several respects.  You have to come in thinking, I’m going to beat whoever’s out there.

Fish then gave this answer: “Look, we don’t make the draw.  You can’t know who you’re going to come up with.  I got lucky in the first two rounds.  No doubt about it.

“Isner played Baghdatis in the first round.  That guy’s really good.  So his draw was tougher than mine, for sure.  There’s no doubt about it.  That’s the luck of the draw in that aspect.

“But, you know, you position yourself to get to a top 8 seed and you don’t have to play one of those guys until the quarters.  That’s where the hard work pays off, I guess.”

Fish just needs to keep winning and the naysayers will eventually subside. Just last year, the 30 year-old was an annual second round loss at all grand slam events. But then he went to the fourth round of the Open and the new Mardy Fish was introduced to the world.

The hard work to move from journeyman to contender wasn’t easy and frankly a long time coming.

Fish’s knock was that he didn’t take care of himself and wasn’t in the type of shape to be a world class player. But then he did a workout regimen that excelled him to the higher echelons of the tennis world.

And it’s the type of advice he wants to give younger players like Jack Sock if he comes to him for advice.

“Take care of my body better,” he said.  “I took that for granted, I think.  Just health.  It’s hard. I mean, look, you know, he’s a very talented player, a good player now.  You know, you just hope they realize that they’re still a long ways away from where he wants to be.  I’m sure of that.

“He’s a confident kid, for sure.  You have to be.  I certainly was at that age.  But, you know, you got to channel that the right way, as well. You know, you got to have some fire, like he does, for sure, but you got to channel it the right way, too.

“I think the most important thing is to keep working hard and to keep ‑ it sounds stupid ‑ but to try to stay on the court as much as you can because you can’t take health for granted, because I certainly did.”

And now he moves on the early rounds of the Open with ease. Fish has a good chance to go to the Quarterfinals but then he will have to face the Dark Knight himself, Roger Federer.

“Obviously Novak has done what he’s done,” he said.  “He’s head and shoulders the guy you really don’t want in your draw right now. I mean, those guys, they present so many problems, so many different problems, all four of them.  And so, yes, you have to get through one of them.  Maybe you don’t.  It’s very lucky if you get to the semis. Obviously to win a tournament, you have to play two of those guys absolutely.  You’re not going to win a tournament without playing two of those guys.”

But that will have to wait, as Fish will take on 34 ranked South African Kevin Anderson, who beat 29th seed Michael Llondra in straight sets today.

 

Mardy Fish Transcript

Q.  What are your thoughts on how you’ll spend the time during the expected hurricane, and what are your thoughts about being here during that in general?

MARDY FISH:  Yeah, it will be pretty surreal, I think.  Obviously it doesn’t happen a lot, but I’ve been through quite a few hurricanes living and growing up in Florida.  I remember maybe going through ‑‑ we had like three or four in one year go through Vero Beach, pretty close to Vero when I was growing up, so we’re used to it.

My wife is a little freaked out about it being from California.  She had the earthquake that I have never been used to, and I’ve got the hurricane that I’m used to.

 

Q.  What’s your advice to New Yorkers who are not used to this?

MARDY FISH:  Well, seems like it’s gonna be like the worst stuff is going to be the floods.  The wind I don’t think will be too much of an issue, although they’re not used this kind of stuff up here.

So if people can stay as calm as possible will probably be the best.

 

Q.  Maria was saying she thought maybe people were overreacting.  What’s your take?

MARDY FISH:  Probably, yeah.  Probably.  I think it’s probably best to prepare for the worst than what it actually is, so…

 

Q.  Were you out and about?  Characterize the mood of the city.

MARDY FISH:  It’s different.  There were still a lot of people out, deliveries of water and things like that to hotels and stuff were out of the ordinary.  Places were closed out of the ordinary.  I couldn’t get my Starbucks this morning, which was annoying.

 

Q.  Were you hoarding?

MARDY FISH:  The hotel coffee wasn’t quite as good.

 

Q.  Were you hoarding last night?

MARDY FISH:  Stacey went to shop quite a bit last night, got a bunch of magazines and flashlights.  She’s preparing for Armageddon, I think.

 

Q.  You could kidnap a Starbucks barista.

MARDY FISH:  I know.  That would be a good idea.

 

Q.  Must be a different feeling coming into New York this year than all the years you have been here.  Can you talk about that for a moment.

MARDY FISH:  Yeah, it’s a significant difference for me.  It’s just great.  I mean, look, this is probably one of the biggest events that I’ll ever play, you know, just being in this position right now and coming in playing extremely well.

You know, winning the US Open Series and just coming in on a high and playing great the last two events, as well.  And then also having that week to prepare and rest ‑ I took three days off right after Cincinnati and played golf once and just relaxed.  It was great to get away from everything.

And then got back in here Tuesday and started grinding again.  You know, so, yeah, I’m super excited to start.  You know, it’s one of those where a lot of times you kinda want to work your way into the tournament.  I want to play Monday.  I want to get out there and start, start the whole process of it, because it’s exciting for me.

 

Q.  It’s a question that we’ve asked at several tournaments, but this being the US Open, it must be very different.  What do you feel coming in as the top‑ranked U.S. male and the top ranked U.S. player?

MARDY FISH:  Slight bit more pressure.  Certainly different pressure than I’ve ever felt.  But a good ‑‑ it’s a great feeling.  I mean, it’s just one of those experiences that not everybody can go through.  I can understand just a little bit of what Andy has gone through every single year for the past 12 years, probably, and respect the job that he’s done with it, as well, and how, you know, how well he’s handled the expectations with his play.

You know, for most of his 10, 12 years here he’s done extremely well, and so I can respect that a ton more, you know, and lean on him and James a little bit to ask some questions and, you know, hopefully take away a little bit of the pressure that Andy has had to deal with for the past, like I said, the past few years.

I’m happy to help in that aspect.

 

Q.  What’s the biggest difference in you as a player now than all the other times you’ve been here?

MARDY FISH:  I’ve got a real good grasp on my fitness right now.  Last year I came in, I was extremely fit at the time, but I was almost too ‑‑ I was right around 170 pounds.  You know, I was almost too skinny.

The stamina maybe wasn’t there quite as good.  I sort of ran out of gas at this tournament against Djokovic.  Not that that really would have mattered the way he played that match.

So I’ve got a good grasp on that.  I’ve got a great grasp on how to leave last weeks’ tournaments in last week, you know, leaving Montreal in Montreal and trying to separate myself from that and go to Cincinnati and start over again and hopefully leave Cincinnati there and start over here and sort of forget all the matches I’ve played in, the mental side of it, the mental sort of fatigue you can get from playing quite a few matches to, you know, starting over and trying to get as fresh as possible.

I think I’ve done and am trying more and more, and it’s a good problem to have, obviously, but something that I’m not used to throughout my career.

So I hope that I’m doing a better job of that, as well, just to kind of start over with each week as a new tournament.  Just previous years I would have had one good result and then I would have been pretty content with that result for a while.

So I hope to not do that.

 

Q.  Last summer obviously you had a great run, sort of launched where you are today.  I’m wondering, coming back in in the course of this year if you wonder or had doubts, Do I have it in me again?  Was that in your mind?

MARDY FISH:  No, that certainly entered my mind.  My goal going into the summer was to come into the US Open in the top 10.  That was a huge goal.  To be honest, it was going to be hard to do.  I had all my points backlogged now, you know, and Cincinnati, 600 points for a guy who’s right around 10, 9, 11, 12, something like that, I mean, there is a difference of back to 18 in the world kind of thing.  There is a big difference between 18 and 8, you know.

So the fact that I was able to, you know, do so well in Montreal took a ton of pressure off me for Cincinnati and put me in a great spot to ‑‑ what I didn’t think was possible was to get more ‑‑ you know, to even gain on what I had done last year.  I put myself in a good position in those events because I actually got a bye in those events, as well, which I had never done in the Masters 1000 events.

I was able to get to the final and play the final of Montreal and have that extra day off in Cincinnati, which was huge, as well.

So, yeah, I mean, I pretty candidly can say I didn’t think I was gonna be in this position right now.

 

Q.  Nice up there in first class, huh?

MARDY FISH:  Yeah, it is.  (Smiling).

 

Q.  What’s impressed you most about the way Djokovic has had, the season he’s had, and what are your thoughts in general about it?

MARDY FISH:  I mean, incredible.  Just the fact ‑‑ like I said, just the fact that to win back‑to‑back Masters events in Indian Wells and Miami, it’s just incredible.  And, you know, not to take away from a Grand Slam title in the beginning of the year.

It’s conceivable that, you know, a guy that good can, you know, can win the first two ‑‑ I think maybe he had won maybe two events only before Indian Wells.  Then, you know, you go to Indian Wells and Miami and you win both of those and beat Nadal in both of those, and you’re thinking, Man, this is a pretty incredible run.

But maybe someone has done that before or maybe, you know, Roger, you know, in kind of ’04, ’05, ’06 era was able to play like that.  And then to win Madrid and Rome back to back, it was just incredible to beat Nadal both of those finals.

I think that really ‑‑ you know, I think he won Belgrade in there, too, but that’s his home event and so we expect him to win those.

But then kind of opened everyone’s eyes to, Man, this is a historic run.  You know, who’s gonna beat this guy kind of thing?  Took the greatest player that we’ve seen to do it, you know.

 

Q.  Serve and volley is an important part of your game.  Do you feel that’s a feature that’s coming back into the men’s game a bit more, especially on hard courts?

MARDY FISH:  I don’t think it’s coming back in.  I don’t see much of it from anyone.  They’ve even slowed down ‑‑ they’ve even slowed down this surface, which is frustrating, because this is one of the ‑‑ this was definitely the fastest slam surface‑wise that we’ve had.

Now with it being, you know, much slower out here this year, it’s sort of fit right in with Australia.  There’s really not ‑‑ there is a lot of really slow Grand Slams now surface‑wise.  Cincinnati and Montreal were extremely fast; Montreal was an extremely fast surface.

I would prefer to play on that surface every single tournament, but it’s not how it works out here.  So, you know, that type of court can warrant some serving and volleying and coming forward.  You can’t serve and volley all the time.  Guys return too good, so you’ve got to keep them off balance and off guard.

I will certainly come to the net here, I have to, but maybe a little bit less than there.

 

Q.  What is your sense of how your belief in your game and your ability, how it compares with Nadal, Federer, and Djokovic right now?

MARDY FISH:  On this surface?  Right now I think it’s up there.  Ask me in two weeks, you know.  I mean, hopefully we’re still sitting here and I can have a conversation with you about it because I’ve never done that.  So it’s hard to say, you know, I expect to see myself in the second Saturday of the US Open because I’ve never done that before.

I’ve been close once, but I’d like to get there now.  I’d really like to get there now, because I really feel like I can belong there.  I can get there.  I can get to a really big spot in a Grand Slam.  And if I were to pick a tournament, a Grand Slam that I could do that in, it would be this one.

 

Q.  You mentioned the surface being slower here.

MARDY FISH:  Uh‑huh.

 

Q.  Is that something this year in particular or over the years?

MARDY FISH:  No, it was pretty fast last year.  It’s definitely different.  But it’s also playing a lot different out there just because of the conditions.  It’s kind of a strange ‑‑ I mean, it’s almost like it’s just raining out of the sky with no rain.  It’s just so humid.  The balls just get extremely big like that with the humidity.

But it’s playing very strange right now.  Hopefully when Monday comes around and the heat comes back a little bit and you get the humidity out of there just a little bit, maybe it will play a little bit differently.

 

Q.  Who would it favor, the slowness of the surface, out of all the top guys?

MARDY FISH:  I think it will favor Djokovic quite a bit.  I think it will play a lot like Australia, to be honest.

I think at night it will play much slower than during the day.  You know, days when it’s pretty humid it will play much slower.

You know, but Rafa likes those conditions, as well, so it’s hard to ‑‑ I mean, Djokovic is, you know, the No. 1 player in the world, so it’s hard not to say that he’s the favorite.  But certainly some guys that can beat him.  I would say he is.

Fish Finishes Off Columbia As The United States Advances

Mardy Fish lost 30 pounds over the last year.We all know that by now.What we don’t fully realize is that Fish may be the best player in the United States right now.Certainly the Colombian Davis Cup team would not disagree with that as Fish became the first American in 15 years to win three David Cup matches in one tie.

Fish defeated Santiago Giraldo of Colombia,3-6,6-3,7-5,4-6,8-6 in Bogota today on red clay to clinch the victory.There is no fifth set tiebreaker in Davis Cup tennis.

With the win,the United States advanced to the World Group.Only once in history has the United States not advanced to the World Group.Columbia has never advanced to the World Group.

Isner won his opening match in 5 sets against Alejandro Falla and teamed with John Isner to win the doubles.Isner dropped his opening singles contest to Giraldo.

It has been quite a year for Fish.He won at Newport and Atlanta and lost in the finals at Cincinnat to Roger Federer after beating Andy Murray.

Fish had two wrist surgeries in 2005 and fell to #341 in the world.That is long forgotten.

The win allowed Patrick McEnroe to keep advancing as United States Davis Cup Captain.He had announced at the US Open that he would step down as davis Cup Captain after this Davis Cup year is over.

World’s No. 1 Doubles Team Mike and Bob Bryan to Host K-Swiss All Star Tennis Fest & Wine Tasting Event

Camarillo, Calif., (Friday, Sept. 17, 2010) – Fresh off their third U.S. Open championship and ninth career Grand Slam title, the all-time winningest men’s doubles team and world No. 1s Bob and Mike Bryan will be joined by Top 25 players and good friends Mardy Fish and Sam Querrey at the K-Swiss All Star Tennis Fest & Wine Tasting event Saturday, Sept. 25, at the Spanish Hills Country Club.

The Bryan Bros. and their Foundation recently announced they would be awarding a $5,000 grant to both the Ventura County Junior Tennis Association and the Santa Barbara Tennis Patrons to financially assist a promising junior player from each area.

“Both the VCJTA and the Santa Barbara Tennis Patrons tournaments and programs were where Mike and Bob were first able to spread their wings as juniors,” said the twins’ father, Wayne Bryan. “Now, they want to give back and would like to provide a deserving junior the same opportunity they had.”
The schedule for the day is from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. with a pro-am, wine tasting and pro exhibition.

General seating tickets are still available for $100 and VIP tables start at $500. Tickets can be purchased through the website at www.bbtennisfest.com.

For more information on the event, log onto www.bbtennisfest.com or contact Dave McKinney at dave@bbtennisfest.com.

Participating restaurants and wineries include: Spanish Hills Country Club, Capistrano’s,

Yolandas, Enoteca Toscana, We Olive, Hahn Wineries, Bianchi Wineries, Ventura County Wine Trails and the California Wine Club.

The Bryans’ victory at Flushing Meadows recently wrapped up a dream summer for the Americans, who are on a 14-match winning streak after coming into the U.S. Open with back-to-back titles at Toronto and Cincinnati. Since Wimbledon they have an unbelievable 22-2 record.

Two weeks before their Toronto triumph, the twins broke the Open Era record for most tour-level doubles titles won by a team with their 62nd victory in Los Angeles.

“This year’s been unbelievable,” said Mike Bryan after the U.S. Open win.

Added Bob Bryan: “This has been the best two weeks of my life.  This was the best match we’ve ever played.  The flood gates have kind of opened since (LA) and we’ve played the best tennis we’ve ever played.  This is the craziest summer we’ve ever had.  To win Toronto, Cincinnati and the Open is a dream come true.”

With nine Grand Slam doubles titles, the 32-year-old Bryans are second on the Open Era leader list behind Todd Woodbridge and Mark Woodforde, who won 11 titles during their career. They have an all-time best 65 career doubles titles and won their two previous U.S. Open titles in 2005 and 2008.

For more information on the Bryan Bros. Foundation see the website at: http://www.bryanbros.com/about-the-foundation.html

About the Bryan Bros. Foundation

The Bryan Bros. Foundation, a non-profit 501c3 organization, is dedicated to helping support and grow the dreams of children in Ventura County and around the world. The Foundation’s mission is to identify and support charities and causes that help at-risk youth survive and thrive. We seek out specific families and children in need, working with them directly to ensure that they have the opportunities they need to succeed. In everything we do, we will promote the ideals of sports, and tennis in particular, to emphasize the values of hard work, dedication and perseverance.

About K-SWISS

Since 1966, K-Swiss has represented innovation, quality, performance and style. Its signature K-Swiss “Classic” was the first leather tennis shoe and made its debut at Wimbledon in 1966. More than 40 years later it is still a style staple both on and off the court. Today, K-Swiss’ premium sports heritage has expanded from tennis footwear, to lifestyle, running, training, nautical, and free-running footwear that stands up to the performance demands of world-class athletes and trendsetters alike. Headquartered in Westlake Village, Calif., K-Swiss currently has ATP stars Bob and Mike Bryan, Mardy Fish and Sam Querrey, as well as WTA stars Liezel Huber, Vera Zvonareva and Alona Bondarenko.

Fish and Isner Put The U.S. In Great Position

Not taking any chances, United States Davis Cup captain Patrick McEnroe made a switch to the veteran Mardy Fish to replace young Ryan Harrison on day two of the U.S. Davis Cup World Group Playoff with Colombia.

And it worked. Teaming with John Isner, the duo beat Robert Farah and Carlos Salamanca of Colombia, 6-4, 6-4, 6-7 (5), 6-3, on Saturday to give the United States a 2-1 lead in the Davis Cup World Group playoff in Bogotá.

“I just went out and gave my best,” said Farah to reporters in Bogota. “Unfortunately, it was not good enough. They (Fish and Isner) played just too good today. I always knew that Mardy Fish is a great doubles player, but I was surprised just how hard John Isner served. I mean there was some balls that I could not even see. Except for losing, I really enjoyed the experience. The environment was just magical.”

McEnroe took a big risk by leaving the Bryan Brothers off the Davis Cup team. The World No. 1 Doubles team did not make the trip because of the high altitude of Bogota, which is at about 8700 feet.

“The altitude had a lot to do with it (absence of Bryans),” McEnroe said to reporters. “I felt that we might need a couple of extra singles players. Fortunately, Mardy gives us choices as a great singles and doubles player.”

With the win today, the United States needs one win in reverse singles tomorrow to avoid relegation and stay in the World Group.

Fish will go again for the U.S. facing Santiago Giraldo. In the second match, Sam Querrey — or Isner, if the United States captain, Patrick McEnroe, makes a change — will face Alejandro Falla.

Asked if he would be tired Sunday, Fish replied: “Not at all. This is what we train for. That’s why we got here early.”

If Fish wins his match Sunday, it would be the first time an American won three times in a Davis Cup contest since Pete Sampras in 1995.

WORLD GROUP SEMIFINALS

FRANCE defeated ARGENTINA 3-0
Venue: Palais des Sports de Gerland, Lyon , France (hard – indoors)

Michael Llodra (FRA) d. Juan Monaco (ARG) 75 46 75 63
Gael Monfils (FRA) d. David Nalbandian (ARG) 64 26 64 63
Arnaud Clement/Michael Llodra (FRA) d. Eduardo Schwank/Horacio Zeballos (ARG) 64 75 63
Gael Monfils (FRA) v Juan Monaco (ARG)
Michael Llodra (FRA) v David Nalbandian (ARG)

CZECH REPUBLIC leads SERBIA 2-1
Venue: Belgrade Arena, Belgrade , Serbia (hard – indoors)

Radek Stepanek (CZE) d. Viktor Troicki (SRB) 46 62 64 64
Janko Tipsarevic (SRB) d. Tomas Berdych (CZE) 75 62 26 76(5)
Tomas Berdych/Radek Stepanek (CZE) d. Novak Djokovic/Nenad Zimonjic (SRB) 36 61 64 61
Viktor Troicki (SRB) v Tomas Berdych (CZE)
Janko Tiparevic (SRB) v Radek Stepanek (CZE)

WORLD GROUP PLAY-OFFS

COLOMBIA level with USA 1-1
Venue: Plaza de Toros La Santamaria, Bogota , Colombia (clay – outdoors)

Mardy Fish ( USA ) d. Alejandro Falla ( COL ) 46 61 64 36 64
Santiago Giraldo ( COL ) d. Sam Querrey ( USA ) 62 64 75
Robert Farah/Carlos Salamanca (COL) v Mardy Fish/John Isner (USA)
Santiago Giraldo (COL) v Mardy Fish (USA)
Alejandro Falla (COL) v Sam Querrey (USA)

* ISRAEL leads AUSTRIA 2-1
Venue: Nokia Stadium, Tel Aviv , Israel (hard – indoors)

Dudi Sela (ISR) d. Andreas Haider-Maurer (AUT) 64 61 63
Jurgen Melzer (AUT) d. Harel Levy (ISR) 64 63 63
Jonathan Erlich/Andy Ram (ISR) d. Jurgen Melzer/Alexander Peya (AUT) 76(2) 64 64
Dudi Sela (ISR) v Jurgen Melzer (AUT)
Harel Levy (ISR) v v Andreas Haider-Maurer (AUT)

* being played 16, 17, 19 September

GERMANY defeated SOUTH AFRICA 3-0
Venue: TC Weissenhof Stuttgart, Stuttgart , Germany (clay – outdoors)

Philipp Kohlschreiber (GER) d. Rik de Voest (RSA) 64 64 64
Florian Mayer (GER) d. Izak van der Merwe (RSA) 63 36 61 76(6)
Andreas Beck/Christopher Kas (GER) d. Rik de Voest/Wesley Moodie (RSA) 64 36 63 64
Philipp Kohlschreiber (GER) v Izak van der Merwe (RSA)
Florian Mayer (GER) v Rik de Voest (RSA)

SWEDEN leads ITALY 2-1
Venue: Sparbanken Lidkoping Arena, Lidkoping, Sweden (hard – indoors)

Potito Starace (ITA) d. Andreas Vinciguerra (SWE) 62 62 62
Robin Soderling (SWE) d. Fabio Fognini (ITA) 61 63 62
Simon Aspelin/Robert Lindstedt (SWE) d. Simone Bolelli/Potito Starace (ITA) 57 67(0) 76(4) 63 75
Robin Soderling (SWE) v Potito Starace (ITA)
Andreas Vinciguerra (SWE) v Fabio Fognini (ITA)

BRAZIL leads INDIA 2-1
Venue: SDAT Tennis Stadium, Chennai , India (hard – outdoors)

Thomaz Bellucci (BRA) d. Rohan Bopanna ( IND ) 67(2) 76(7) 75 46 108
Ricardo Mello (BRA) d. Somdev Devvarman ( IND ) 46 62 67(3) 62 64
Mahesh Bhupathi/Leander Paes ( IND ) d. Marcelo Melo/Bruno Soares (BRA) 64 76(5) 61
Somdev Devvarman (IND) v Thomaz Bellucci (BRA)
Rohan Bopanna (IND) v Ricardo Mello (BRA)

AUSTRALIA leads BELGIUM 2-1
Venue: Cairns Regional Tennis Centre, Cairns , Australia (hard – outdoors)

Lleyton Hewitt (AUS) d. Ruben Bemelmans (BEL) 76(4) 75 26 64
Olivier Rochus (BEL) d. Carsten Ball (AUS) 64 64 76(5)
Paul Hanley/Lleyton Hewitt (AUS) d. Ruben Bemelmans/Olivier Rochus (BEL) 61 62 64
Lleyton Hewitt (AUS) v Olivier Rochus (BEL)
Carsten Ball (AUS) v Ruben Bemelmans (BEL)

KAZAKHSTAN defeated SWITZERLAND 3-0
Venue: The National Tennis Centre, Astana, Kazakhstan (hard – indoors)

Andrey Golubev (KAZ) d. Marco Chiudinelli (SUI) 64 64 64
Mikhail Kukushkin (KAZ) d. Stanislas Wawrinka (SUI) 36 61 64 16 63
Andrey Golubev/Yuriy Schukin (KAZ) d. Yves Allegro/Stanislas Wawrinka (SUI) 64 63 63
Andrey Golubev (KAZ) v Stanislas Wawrinka (SUI)
Mikhail Kukushkin (KAZ) v Marco Chiudinelli (SUI)

ROMANIA defeated ECUADOR 3-0
Venue: Centrul National de Tenis, Bucharest, Romania (clay – outdoors)

Victor Hanescu (ROU) d. Ivan Endara (ECU) 62 62 62
Adrian Ungur (ROU) d. Giovanni Lapentti (ECU) 67(2) 46 63 64 61
Victor Hanescu/Horia Tecau (ROU) d. Ivan Endara/Giovanni Lapentti (ECU) 62 62 62
Victor Hanescu (ROU) v Giovanni Lapentti (ECU)
Adrian Ungur (ROU) v Ivan Endara (ECU)

EUROPE/AFRICA ZONE GROUP I SECOND ROUND PLAY-OFFS

SLOVAK REPUBLIC leads BELARUS 2-1
Venue: Republic Olympic Training Center for Tennis, Minsk, Belarus (hard – outdoors)

Uladzimir Ignatik (BLR) d. Martin Klizan (SVK) 76(9) 62 62
Lukas Lacko (SVK) d. Siarhei Betau (BLR) 60 64 64
Michael Mertinak/Filip Polasek (SVK) d. Uladzimir Ignatik/Max Mirnyi (BLR) 76(5) 76(6) 36 46 64
Uladzimir Ignatik (BLR) v Lukas Lacko (SVK)
Siarhei Betau (BLR) v Martin Klizan (SVK)

POLAND leads LATVIA 2-1
Venue: Olympic Sports Centre, Riga, Latvia (carpet – indoors)

Michal Przysiezny (POL) d. Andis Juska (LAT) 63 64 64
Ernests Gulbis (LAT) d. Jerzy Janowicz (POL) 64 64 36 62
Mariusz Fyrstenberg/Marcin Matkowski (POL) d. Andis Juska/Deniss Pavlovs (LAT) 63 64 76(4)
Ernests Gulbis (LAT) v Michael Przysieszny (POL)
Andis Juska (LAT) v Jerzy Janowicz (POL)

AMERICAS ZONE GROUP I SECOND ROUND PLAY-OFF

CANADA leads DOMINICAN REPUBLIC 2-0
Venue: Rexall Centre – Grandstand Court, Toronto, Canada (hard – outdoors)

Peter Polansky (CAN) d. Jhonson Garcia (DOM) 76(4) 46 63 63
Milos Raonic (CAN) d. Victor Estrella (DOM) 57 62 36 76(3) 97
Frank Dancevic/Daniel Nestor (CAN) v Victor Estrella/Jhonson Garcia (DOM)
Peter Polansky (CAN) v Victor Estrella (DOM)
Milos Raonic (CAN) v Jhonson Garcia (DOM)

ASIA/OCEANIA ZONE GROUP I SECOND ROUND PLAY-OFF

KOREA, REP. leads PHILIPPINES 2-1
Venue: Chanwon Municipal Tennis Courts, Changwon , Korea , Rep. (hard – outdoors)

Yong-Kyu Lim (KOR) d. Treat Huey (PHI) 67(8) 62 76(7) 76(4)
Suk-Young Jeong (KOR) d. Cecil Mamiit (PHI) 06 16 63 60 62
Cecil Mamiit / Treat Huey (PHI) d. Hyun-Joon Kim/Jae-Min Seol (KOR) 63 64 64
Yong-Kyu Lim (KOR) v Cecil Mamiit (PHI)
Suk-Young Jeong (KOR) v Treat Huey (PHI)

EUROPE/AFRICA ZONE GROUP II THIRD ROUND

LITHUANIA leads SLOVENIA 2-1
Venue: SEB Arena, Vilnius , Lithuania (hard – indoors)

Richard Berankis (LTU) d. Blaz Kavcic (SLO) 36 62 76(9) 64
Grega Zemlja (SLO) d. Laurynas Grigelis (LTU) 63 76(4) 63
Richard Berankis/Laurynas Grigelis (LTU) d. Grega Zemla/Luka Gregorc (SLO) 57 46 61 63 63
Richard Berankis (LTU) v Grega Zemlja (SLO)
Laurynas Grigelis (LTU) v Blaz Kavcic (SLO)

PORTUGAL level with BOSNIA & HERZEGOVINA 1-1
Venue: Centro de Tenis Do Jamor, Cruz Quebrada, Portugal (clay – outdoors)

Frederico Gil (POR) d. Amer Delic (BIH) 63 64 67(14) 36 97
Aldin Setkic (BIH) d. Rui Machado (POR) 64 63 16 61
Frederico Gil/Leonardo Tavares (POR) v Amer Delic/Aldin Setkic (BIH)
Frederico Gil (POR) v Aldin Setkic (BIH)
Rui Machado (POR) v Amer Delic (BIH)

AMERICAS ZONE GROUP II FINAL

MEXICO leads VENEZUELA 2-0
Venue: Rafael El Pelon Osuna, Delg. Miguel Hidalgo, Mexico (clay – outdoors)

Daniel Garza (MEX) d. Roman Recarte (VEN) 62 62 62
Cesar Ramirez (MEX) d. Jose De Armas (VEN) 61 63 63
Bruno Rodriguez/Miguel Angel Reyes Varela (MEX) v Jose De Armas/Piero Luisi (VEN)
Daniel Garza (MEX) v Jose De Armas (VEN)
Cesar Ramirez (MEX) v Roman Recarte (VEN)

ASIA/OCEANIA ZONE GROUP II FINAL

NEW ZEALAND leads THAILAND 2-1
Venue: National Tennis Development Centre (LTAT), Nontheburi , Thailand (hard – outdoors)

Michael Venus (NZL) d. Weerapat Doakmaiklee (THA) 63 62 76(1)
Jose Statham (NZL) d. Kittiphong Wachiramanowong (THA) 46 76(5) 61 76(2)
Sanchai Ratiwatana/Sonchat Ratiwatana (THA) d. Daniel King-Turner/Michael Venus (NZL) 06 67(6) 60 63 64
Kittiphong Wachiramanowong (THA) v Michael Venus (NZL)
Weerapat Doakmaiklee (THA) v Jose Statham (NZL)