Murray Qualifies for ATP World Finals

LONDON — 2012 Olympic gold medalist Andy Murray will return to London this November to compete at the season-ending Barclays ATP World Tour Finals, held at The O2 from 5-12 November.

Murray’s win over Marin Cilic on Wednesday to reach the US Open semi-finals guaranteed the Brit his place among the world’s top eight players at the season-ending tournament in London. It will be the first time that Murray returns to compete in the UK following his remarkable gold medal run at the Olympic Games in August.

Murray, who also reached this year’s Wimbledon final, has thrived whilst competing in London in 2012, and can now look ahead to taking on the world’s best in November at The O2. The Brit also captured the title at the Brisbane International in Australia in January, as well as reaching finals at the Dubai Duty Free Tennis Championships in Dubai and the Sony Open Tennis in Miami.

“It’s great to have qualified again for London. I’ve played some of my best tennis this year on home soil, so hopefully I can also have a good run at The O2 in November. The atmosphere and the support I’ve had there has always been incredible,” said the Brit.

Murray is the fourth singles player to qualify for the season-ending finale, joining Novak Djokovic, Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal in the player field in London. Four singles spots still remain up for grabs, with the likes of Jo-Wilfried Tsonga, David Ferrer, Juan Martin Del Potro and Tomas Berdych all in contention to join the top four in London.

Brad Drewett, ATP Executive Chairman & President, said: “My congratulations go to Andy on qualifying for the 2012 Barclays ATP World Tour Finals. Andy has put together another stellar season on the ATP World Tour and truly deserves his place among the top eight in London. His qualification is wonderful news for tennis fans in the UK who will get another chance to show their support for Andy in November following his outstanding performances at Wimbledon and the Olympics this past summer.”

The season-ending event once again looks set to provide a thrilling finale to what has already been a remarkable season on the  ATP World Tour, with the year-end World No.1 South African Airways ATP Ranking  potentially coming down to the wire at the last event of the season in London.

With tickets still available for the 2012 Barclays ATP World Tour Finals, don’t miss your chance to witness the world’s top eight singles players and doubles teams competing for the world’s biggest indoor tennis tournament. For more information, visit: www.BarclaysATPWorldTourFinals.com.

An Excerpt from “Quest for Perfection”

Roger Federer is looking for his sixth straight US Open men’s singles title at the 2009. The first of his five straight titles in New York came in 2004 when he defeated Lleyton Hewitt, his third-round victim in 2009, in the final. Rene Stauffer, the author of the Federer biography THE ROGER FEDERER STORY: QUEST FOR PERFECTION ($24.95, New Chapter Press, www.RogerFedererBook.com) details the 2004 US Open final between Federer and Hewitt in his celebrated tome. The brief book excerpt is seen below…

Awaiting him in the final was another of his past nemeses, Lleyton Hewitt, the 2001 US Open champion. The Australian skipped the Olympic Games, but won the two ATP tournaments played concurrently to the Olympics in Washington, D.C. and in Long Island. Entering his match with Federer, he won his last 16 matches and did not surrender a set in his six-match run to the final.

It only took 17 minutes for Federer to hand Hewitt his first lost set of the tournament, losing only five points in a near perfect execution of tennis. When Hewitt won his first game of the match after Federer led 6-0, 2-0, the crowd at Arthur Ashe Stadium gave him a standing ovation. Federer contin­ued to be the much stronger player, until a lapse of concentration and a run of errors and missed serves allowed Hewitt to win four straight games after trailing 2-5 in the second set.

“If he had managed to win the second set, it would have turned out to be an entirely different match,” Federer said. “I forced myself to keep positive. I said to myself that I only got this break because I was playing against the wind and I was serving with old balls. When I changed sides, everything actually did go easier.”

Federer held serve at 5-6 to force the tiebreak and won that 7-3. The two-set lead broke Hewitt’s resistance and Federer plowed through the final set 6-0 to win his first US Open championship.

“First I was surprised that Lleyton was no longer getting to the ball,” Federer said of his moment of victory. “Then I was suddenly lying on my back, look­ing into the sky at the lights of the stadium. I thought, ‘That’s unbelievable.’ Once again I was close to tears.”